©​​​ GLPIPL  2017

 

Great Lakes Piping Plovers

Individual Stories

Individually unique color-band codes have given us the opportunity to get to know individual Piping Plovers. We are able to track some of them over many years, summer and winter. Here are a few stories about plovers we have come to know.

Summer 2016:

BO:X,g, at 15 years, now holds the record of the oldest plover recorded in the Great Lakes population. Two Great Lakes females survived for 14 years. His mate from 2014 and 2015, Of,GL:X,Y,  is featured below.

This fellow is known as Box-gee (for the pattern of band colors on his legs) in Michigan and "Old Man Plover" in South Carolina where he winters. He hatched way back in 2002 at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, and has been nesting near his hatch site since 2005. He usually wins the race to return to his nesting territory, or ties with another male, "Packer Boy" from Manistee (see story below).

The crew at Sleeping Bear Dunes is quite attached to him. During his many summers we've watched him successfully raise and fledge 36 chicks…he seldom has lost any.

At the end of each summer he wings his way south to South Carolina where a different set of plover monitors wait for him. July 2016 was his 15th trip south! We don’t know exactly what route he takes, but if he flew directly from his summer territory at Sleeping Bear Dunes to his winter territory near Charleston, SC and back, he would have migrated 25,752 miles so far. (The circumference of the Earth is 24,901 miles)

I hope to see him back up at Sleeping Bear Dunes again next April.

David McLean in South Carolina has made a post about Old Man Plover’s return south at http://birdingbulls.blogspot.com

Update Spring 2017: BO:X,g was seen along his way north at Port Dover, Ontario on April 11th and 12th. He made it back to his territory in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore on April 13th, 2017. This is the same day he returned in 2015 and 2016. He was last seen at Port Dover around 6 PM (4/12) and arrived by 11:30 AM at Sleeping Bear - making the 330 mile trip in less than 17.5 hours. Not bad for an old guy. He has now traveled more than 26,640 miles in migration. 

Update Summer 2017: BO:X,g found a mate at Sleeping Bear Dunes. They had four eggs and were well into incubation when he disappeared. The eggs were brought to captive-rearing and the only fertile one produced his last (and 37th) chick - Of,B/OO:X,G, or "Junior". This chick was released at Sleeping Bear Dunes and has now made it to Florida! BO:X,g's good genetics are well represented in the Great Lakes population.

Old Man Plover's Last chick.

 

"Little Cooper" - Shortly after his release at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore

In 2012 on June 19th, a windy day at the mouth of the Platte River in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, two plover monitors (Ben Cooper and Ben Papes) were finishing their rounds checking on the nests and making sure all the adult plovers were accounted for. They turned back for a last look as a particularly large wave washed out one of the nests. Immediately they began searching for the four missing eggs. After hours of searching they found all of the eggs - an amazing feat considering how well the eggs are camouflaged.  The rescued eggs were transported to Eastport, MI where zookeepers met them to bring the eggs the rest of the way to the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS). Once at UMBS they (like most other abandoned Piping Plover eggs in the Great Lakes) were raised by the avian specialist zoo-keepers who were volunteering there. Upon arrival it was discovered that one of the eggs had cracked and didn't survive. Another chick died at hatching.

Two of the eggs hatched sucessfully. Those chicks were initially housed indoors in a large box with sand on the floor and a feather duster hung over it to simulate a brooding parent. Recordings of the sounds of the shoreline were played to mask the human noises around them and to make their temporary home more like the beach. Once they were able to stay warm without assistance (thermo-regulate) they spent days outside in a flight cage along the shore of Douglas Lake. Here they grew, learned to find food and to fly.

Chicks in indoor pen

Chicks in outdoor flight cage

When they were flying very well, zookeeper Bonnie Van Dam, from the Detroit Zoo brought them back to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore where we released them, along with another captive-reared chick, near their origin and near wild-reared chicks of similar age. They were dubbed "Little Cooper" and "Little Papes" in honor of their rescuers.

Ready to be released ("Little Cooper" on right)

Just after release ("Little Cooper" on right)

Little Papes apparently didn't survive, but Little Cooper showed up in Volusia county, Florida after evading predators and navigating his way to the coast. He's been returning each summer to breed in Canada at Wasaga Beach, Ontario and continues to spend winters in Volusia county. He's a true captive-rearing success story. 

"Little Cooper" in Florida

"Little Cooper" up north

Update Summer 2017: For unknown reasons Little Cooper didn't return to Wasaga Beach to nest this summer. He was seen several times in Michigan...both at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, and in the Upper Peninsula at Au Train. No breeding behaviors were observed. 

Update January 2018: "Little Cooper" was photographed in Volusia County, FL in mid January by winter observer John Kendall. He made it back to his winter home for a fifth year. 

Update Summer 2018: "Little Cooper" returned to Wasaga Beach, Ontario to nest and successfully fledged four chicks. 

Update 7/23/2019: "Little Cooper" made it south for the winter of 2018-19 (where they know him as "Jack the Pumpkin King"), then north again to breed at Wasaga Beach. (where they know him as Worsley). On 7/23/2019 he was spotted at  Poplar Island, Talbot County, MD (www.poplarislandrestoration.com) on his way back south. 

Update 8/21/2019: "Little Cooper" continues his trip south. He's now been sighted at Hilton Head Island. 

Of,GL:X,Y (“named” for her bands. Left leg - Orange flag, Green, bLack. Right leg – X for USGS aluminum band, Yellow) hatched in 2011 at Silver Lake State Park, south of Ludington, MI, and has nested since 2012 near the mouth of the Platte River in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.  She has only been reported once on wintering grounds, in January of 2013, on an island off the coast of Louisiana. Because Piping Plovers are very tied to their wintering, as well as their breeding territories, it’s likely that she spends winters in that area and began her journey north from there.

This spring she didn’t return to Sleeping Bear Dunes at the usual time. Her mate from the past two summers, BO:X,g (See story above) waited alone for a mate to arrive. 

On 5/2 and 5/3, David Bree, Park Naturalist at Presqu’ile Provincial Park on the north shore of Lake Ontario, spotted and photographed her 420 miles (675 km) east of her usual summer destination. He reported his observation to plover@umn.edu and our tracking of her travels began. It’s possible that the persistent northwest winds this spring blew her off course.

She was seen at Presq’ile again on 5/8, but by 5/9 and 5/10 she had traveled 120 miles (190 km) west where monitors at Wasaga Beach, Ontario, observed her. Then, for an unknown reason, she returned to Presq’ile Provincial Park on 5/12 and 5/13.

Four days later, by 5/17, she had traveled 420 miles (675 km) back to Michigan and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. She was first spotted by monitors on North Manitou Island, only 25 miles (40 km) as the plover flies from her usual nesting spot. By the next day she had found her way back to her old summer home at the mouth of the Platte River in Sleeping Bear Dunes, and was seen hanging out with her old mate BO:X,g.

I wish I could say it was a happy ending to the story, however on 5/19 she was gone, never to be seen again. She was very likely captured by the Merlin who was hunting the area at that time. 

(BO:X,g attracted a one-year-old captive-reared female and raised chicks with her.)

 

Thank you to all the monitors whose detailed observations and diligent reporting have made it possible to piece together this story of Of,GL:X,Y's spring travels.

 

The fastest migration we've documented so far is that of Of,GG:X,Y. 

Rangel Diaz

 

This female was documented at the mouth of the Platte River in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, MI at 10:15 on July 22, 2013. On the morning of July 24 at 6:15 she was photographed at Crandon Park near Miami, FL. If she left immediately after being seen on 7/22 and arrived just before being photographed on 7/24 and flew a straight line to her destination she would have had to average 31 MPH.

Ob:X,b - Rocky

Rocky first made a name for himself in 2006 on North Manitou Island. It had been noticed that there were two well-developed scrapes in the area of his nest – one with eggs in it, one without. Since it was his first nesting attempt he had not yet received his unique adult color-band combination. When we arrived to capture and band him his mate was incubating so we settled in to wait and prepare to band him. We chose and readied the bands that would identify him for the rest of his life and aligned our spotting scopes on the nest then sat down to watch and wait. After a long wait Rocky finally returned to take his turn. When Mark walked to the nest to set the banding trap, he made an interesting discovery. Rocky wasn’t sitting on the nest! He was incubating some rocks in the second scrape. We thought it must have been an accident so Mark smoothed out the extra scrape and set the trap over the nest, and then he moved away from the nest and out of sight. Rocky returned immediately to the nest area, paid no attention to the trap, made a new scrape in the same location as his previous one and settled down to incubate. Mark approached the nest area once more and moved the trap to Rocky’s scrape. As soon as Mark moved away Rocky returned and was trapped on his empty scrape.  At this time he got his adult bands: orange over light blue on the left leg and aluminum over light blue on the right.

 

 

We then began watching Rocky and his mate more closely. They took turns incubating in the usual way but she sat on the nest with four-eggs and he took his turn on his own “nest” incubating a few egg-sized rocks.  Ten days after their due date, when the eggs still hadn’t hatched, they were collected and brought to the University of Michigan Biological station. Someone asked for an egg-candling demonstration and it was discovered that 3 of the chicks were still alive! The Captive-rearing zookeepers helped the chicks to make it out of their shells. Two didn’t have enough yolk sac left and died, but one survived.

The next year Rocky was back with a new mate. I found his mate incubating and watched for a nest exchange. To my joy Rocky sat on the same location his mate had left. When I checked to see how many eggs they had, I discovered that they were incubating three eggs and a rock!

His mate laid another egg; he added another rock and they incubated steadily until the chicks hatched. Once the chicks hatched he left his rocks behind and never again incubated rocks.

After a “rocky” start he became one of the most successful males, shuttling back and forth between his North Manitou Island summer home and his winter territory at Crandon Beach State Park near Miami, Florida and fledging many chicks. He was last seen 3/26/2014 at Kiawah Island, South Carolina along his way north.

Of,YG:X,G - aka Packer Boy

Our successful male plover known as Packer Boy hatched in 2006 on North Manitou Island in the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. He is the son of LO:X,Y and X,Y:O,b.

Packer Boy first showed his true colors as a super dad in 2008 at 5th Avenue Beach in Manistee, MI. In May of 2008, there was news that a plover pair was spotted and breeding behavior was seen at the 5th Avenue Beach. Stephanie Schubel and Kelsey Hunt from the Great Lakes Banding Crew went to the beach to further investigate and lo and behold a Piping Plover pair was spotted. Upon further observation in the beautiful cobble area of the beach, the male plover became very, vocal and defensive. Stephanie and Kelsey patiently waited and inspected from a safe distance, and suddenly noticed that the male plover was standing protectively over a 1 egg nest. After a full clutch of four eggs was laid, the banding crew returned and banded this fierce father with a pattern of green and yellow bands. His band combo was chosen by a local Manistee Forest Service employee who was a Green Bay Packers fan. Thus, started the story of Packer Boy.

He is fondly loved by many in the Manistee area and around the Great Lakes Piping Plover region. He is often one of the first plovers to return to the breeding grounds and start a nest in the spring. In all but 1 of the 10 years he has been breeding he has fledged 3 or 4 chicks. That is truly an amazing feat under any circumstances, but the 5th Avenue Beach is a busy beach with people, dogs, and gulls!  Packer Boy has some great parenting skills and good genes. We are lucky to have him in our population and thankful to all those who help protect and keep watch over him, his mate and his chicks every year.

A mystery about Packer Boy's life is where he spends his winters. He has never yet been reported away from his Manistee summer territory. Where does he go? 

UPDATE WINTER 2018-19: Packer Boy was seen twice in August at  Padre Island, Texas. Perhaps he was headed farther south into Mexico. 

UPDATE SUMMER 2019: There were no further reports of Packer Boy until he returned north in spring. He was seen at his usual nesting location in Manistee then disappeared. Given his advanced age, 13 years old, we feared the worst. However in July he turned up on a beach at Sleeping Bear Dunes and probably had a secret nesting spot on some secluded beach near Manistee. 

Of,-:X,Vb - aka Violet

Violet (nicknamed for being the first Great Lakes Piping Plover to receive a violet-colored band) hatched in 2016 at the mouth of Platte River in Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Benzie county, MI. She and two siblings fledged from that nest and she headed south with her sister to winter together in northern Florida near the Georgia border. It’s quite unusual for siblings to stay together.

In the spring of 2017 both Violet and her sister returned to Sleeping Bear Dunes -- Violet to her hatch-place at the mouth of the Platte River and her sister to South Manitou Island. Violet’s first nesting attempts were unsuccessful. She and her mate started two nests too close to the shore. Both were washed out by waves after she laid only one or two eggs.  After this disappointing summer she headed back south to Florida, stopping over in Beaufort County, SC from August until October.

Along the way south Violet got some fiber wrapped around her left foot. It was quite tight and cut off circulation to her toes.  Monitors in Florida noticed her injury and contacted the necessary authorities with proper training to attempt to catch her and remove the fiber. They made several unsuccessful attempts. The next time they saw her it was too late. She had lost her toes. During the winter of 2017-18 she also lost her sister.

In the spring of 2018 she returned to Sleeping Bear Dunes but chose her nesting location more wisely. She nested near Glen Haven and, with her mate, successfully raised and fledged two of their four chicks (above average for Piping Plovers). She was re-banded at this time with the unique combination of band colors that will identify her for the rest of her life.

 

Like most Piping Plover females she left her nesting territory in July and, as is usual for her, spent the late summer and fall in Beaufort County, SC before heading back to northern Florida for the rest of the winter.

Spring 2019 brought her back to Sleeping Bear Dunes, another new mate and a slightly different territory. Her 2019 mate was an old guy…at least 13 years old… and he vanished not long after their three chicks hatched. It’s thought that he was caught by a predator...likely a Merlin. One chick disappeared immediately after hatching and another disappeared at the same time as its dad. Violet was very protective of the one remaining chick. It survived and last we heard was doing well on August 8th in Dare county, NC.

It's August 2019 and Violet is once again hanging out in Beaufort County, SC along her way south. Aside from a slightly off-kilter gait and very distinctive tracks she seems little-hampered by her lost toes.

Watch for more stories to be added....